Coruña

Language Learning at Its Finest - by Nicki Bonura

When I first arrived in A Coruna, everything was new. I had never had to deal with using a public bus system. I had never lived in a place where you can’t predict whether there’s going to be rain or shine on any given summer day. And, most importantly, I had never lived in a city located in Spain.

Moving here engulfed me in a whole new world where simple tasks were challenging. Everyday activities had to be completed under the context of a new culture and a new language. Over the course of a few weeks, I had to ask each of my three flat mates at three different times how the cleaning schedule worked in our apartment before I understood my chores. The first time I went out for breakfast, it was 10:00 am on a Sunday, which is the time in-between breakfast and most restaurants opening for lunch. After wandering around for 45 minutes without finding food, I ended up resorting to a Punto 24hr. My first breakfast in Spain was a sandwich out of a vending machine. Every time I needed to speak to anyone about anything, I would have to think about how to say it beforehand. Rather than reading instructions, public notices, news articles, and menus, I would have to translate them.

The experience of immersing yourself in a foreign language can be described as the very definition of new, and unfortunately, new is rarely easy. Putting yourself in a position where constant adjustment is necessary can be difficult, and frankly, exhausting. However, I can easily say that the rewards you gain in return really are worth it. I have spoken and formed relationships with people whom I otherwise wouldn’t have been able to talk to.  I now have a better understanding of another culture, which gives me a new lens to look through at my own and appreciate their similarities and differences. And finally, the most unexpected result is that cultural immersion and language learning has enforced my confidence in my own capabilities. In my opinion, making mistakes under these circumstances is inevitable. However, when they are made, you have no choice but to move on and try again. If you can adopt this mentality and use it in all your pursuits, you will be more willing to reach for your goals and less discouraged when you make a blunder.

For those of you continuing to study a new language, I encourage you to surround yourself with that language as much as you possibly can. New may be difficult, but something can only be new for so long. With exposure, patience, and a whole lot of practice, new becomes familiar, and your confidence will grow.

When I first arrived in A Coruna, everything was new. I had never had to deal with using a public bus system. I had never lived in a place where you can’t predict whether there’s going to be rain or shine on any given summer day. And, most importantly, I had never lived in a city located in Spain.

Moving here engulfed me in a whole new world where simple tasks were challenging. Everyday activities had to be completed under the context of a new culture and a new language. Over the course of a few weeks, I had to ask each of my three flat mates at three different times how the cleaning schedule worked in our apartment before I understood my chores. The first time I went out for breakfast, it was 10:00 am on a Sunday, which is the time in-between breakfast and most restaurants opening for lunch. After wandering around for 45 minutes without finding food, I ended up resorting to a Punto 24hr. My first breakfast in Spain was a sandwich out of a vending machine. Every time I needed to speak to anyone about anything, I would have to think about how to say it beforehand. Rather than reading instructions, public notices, news articles, and menus, I would have to translate them.

The experience of immersing yourself in a foreign language can be described as the very definition of new, and unfortunately, new is rarely easy. Putting yourself in a position where constant adjustment is necessary can be difficult, and frankly, exhausting. However, I can easily say that the rewards you gain in return really are worth it. I have spoken and formed relationships with people whom I otherwise wouldn’t have been able to talk to.  I now have a better understanding of another culture, which gives me a new lens to look through at my own and appreciate their similarities and differences. And finally, the most unexpected result is that cultural immersion and language learning has enforced my confidence in my own capabilities. In my opinion, making mistakes under these circumstances is inevitable. However, when they are made, you have no choice but to move on and try again. If you can adopt this mentality and use it in all your pursuits, you will be more willing to reach for your goals and less discouraged when you make a blunder.

For those of you continuing to study a new language, I encourage you to surround yourself with that language as much as you possibly can. New may be difficult, but something can only be new for so long. With exposure, patience, and a whole lot of practice, new becomes familiar, and your confidence will grow.

A Teacher's Perspective: The New School Year

Starting to learn anything is quite scary. We feel worried about how difficult it might be, we become embarrassed by the mistakes we make, and we feel insecure about whether we are able to achieve our goals. 

Today I would like to offer the teacher's perspective, so that you can see how different it feels to be on the other side. This is, of course, a very personal experience and other teachers might see it differently.

 

The first class is nerve-wracking for everybody. As the students come in, nobody knows how it will go. Although everything is prepared for the students to have an easier lesson, there are many questions that come to mind. Will the students get along? Will my classes meet their expectations? Will they enjoy the material I have prepared? 

Meeting new people can be uncomfortable. We all introduce ourselves, and we give each other a brief description of who we are. As a teacher, my intention is to give the students funny or interesting information about myself so they feel more comfortable and less nervous. The moment we are all laughing together, we can start working as a group, and everybody tends to relax.

We continue by introducing material to the students and getting them to understand what we intend to do over the next few months. Each group works in a completely different way, but what is almost always true is that after the first 90 minutes in English, most people are very tired. Forcing your brain to work in a different language when you are not used to it is very similar to going to the gym when you're not accustomed. 

The next few lessons are still tiring and sometimes a little frustrating for the students, although I always adapt the rhythm those few lessons so that nobody suffers too much. However, within the first few weeks, almost everybody feels happy and enjoys themselves in every lesson - the magic here lies in being a little patient and persevering. 

Although I am aware that this process is more difficult for the students, they need to remember that everybody is in the same position, and that if they invest a little patience, the rewards will definitely be worth it!

Lyrics Training

Hello again!

This week we discovered the website LyricsTraning through a recommendation from one of our lovely TeaTimers. The idea of this website is for you to watch a music video and fill the gaps of different words the singer is saying. There are 4 different levels, and it is truly fun.

Our experience with this website has been fantastic, and they also tell you where the singer is from, which means you can listen to different accents and see what they say. This tool is great for everybody because you can choose the video according to the genre you prefer, or the language you would like to practise (there are also songs in other languages), and you can enjoy every second of the learning experience. 

So, what are you waiting for? 

http://es.lyricstraining.com/